11 Responses

  1. Bernard Schokman
    Bernard Schokman at |

    Well done Lis. I’ve just dropped into this area to compliment my UX design becuase I consider it will be a worthy advisory for my designs as well as giving me the clout to propose well thought out designs for my clients. Looking forward to researching more on this topic in the future. Like right now. 🙂 Cheers Bernard

    Reply
  2. psychologist perth
    psychologist perth at |

    Great post Lis, thanks for sharing! Also thanks for the links Danny.

    Reply
  3. Anon
    Anon at |

    Love the photo. You look mah-velous…

    Reply
  4. Lis Hubert
    Lis Hubert at |

    Wonderful and insightful points!! Thanks!

    Reply
  5. dannyhotea
    dannyhotea at |

    Very interesting post, Lis.I recently read Outliers by Malcom Gladwell. He mentions (what I consider) a mind-blowing insite: the effect of culture in communication, noting Culture’s Consequences (http://books.google.com/books?id=w6z18LJ_1VsC&p…) by Geert Hofstede. Hofstede did a study for IBM to determine how culture affects individual perception of authority and such.Another interesting read is Culture Code, by Clotaire Rapaille (http://www.amazon.com/Culture-Code-Ingenious-Un…). He helped Jeep by “decoding” America’s code for Jeep. He says it’s “horse” and horses have round eyes. So, they changed the headlights from squares to circles and sales increased.That’s more product dev and branding stuff. But I find the way culture permeates everything we do staggering.I’m willing to bet that UX and psychology would mesh well with cross-cultural studies as well.

    Reply
    1. Lis Hubert
      Lis Hubert at |

      Wonderful and insightful points!! Thanks!

      Reply
  6. dannyhotea
    dannyhotea at |

    Very interesting post, Lis.

    I recently read Outliers by Malcom Gladwell. He mentions (what I consider) a mind-blowing insite: the effect of culture in communication, noting Culture's Consequences (http://books.google.com/books?id=w6z18LJ_1VsC&p…) by Geert Hofstede. Hofstede did a study for IBM to determine how culture affects individual perception of authority and such.

    Another interesting read is Culture Code, by Clotaire Rapaille (http://www.amazon.com/Culture-Code-Ingenious-Un…). He helped Jeep by “decoding” America's code for Jeep. He says it's “horse” and horses have round eyes. So, they changed the headlights from squares to circles and sales increased.

    That's more product dev and branding stuff. But I find the way culture permeates everything we do staggering.

    I'm willing to bet that UX and psychology would mesh well with cross-cultural studies as well.

    Reply
  7. Chris Avore
    Chris Avore at |

    You raise a lot of good points here, Lis, especially when you consider what it is we really should know about psychology and its influences on user experience.

    I’m in your camp: I’m not sure every UXer with Photoshop and a shiny new Mac should be quoting Freud or Skinner without a broader, deeper understanding of just what they’re arguing.

    What if a one person stands hard and fast on a psychological theory that was later disproved? I just finished reading a text steeped in Soviet-era psychology with Euro socialist influences that attempted to grow beyond basic tenets cognitive psyche interaction design. But what if my only experience was in cognitive psyche that was called into question by post-cog activity theorists?

    Okay, so that’s probably off the deep end: I understand the general thought here is to get every-day practitioners to think about why people behave the way they do, in easy to eat, bite-size wrappers (and if you can mention neurons, synapses or cognitive overload, all the better, right?).

    So like a lot of things, I think UX designers should tread carefully. Don’t tell a client to shove off when you think their design strategy doesn’t jive with what you think you learned in Psyche 101 in 2003 (or if you just finished one book on activity theory ;-)), but let fundamental, generally accepted principles of psychology influence how your audience may engage with your product or service (but just be prepared to back it up).

    Reply
    1. Lis Hubert
      Lis Hubert at |

      Hahaha well said! My overall thinking is that it would be cool (in Lis’ ideal world) to have to someone else on my team to help back it up. So I know Psych 101 but this person wrote the entire curriculum and can help us better decipher my points…. one can dream.

      Reply
  8. Lis Hubert
    Lis Hubert at |

    Hahaha well said! My overall thinking is that it would be cool (in Lis' ideal world) to have to someone else on my team to help back it up. So I know Psych 101 but this person wrote the entire curriculum and can help us better decipher my points…. one can dream.

    Reply
  9. Chris Avore
    Chris Avore at |

    You raise a lot of good points here, Lis, especially when you consider what it is we really should know about psychology and its influences on user experience.

    I'm in your camp: I'm not sure every UXer with Photoshop and a shiny new Mac should be quoting Freud or Skinner without a broader, deeper understanding of just what they're arguing.

    What if a one person stands hard and fast on a psychological theory that was later disproved? I just finished reading a text steeped in Soviet-era psychology with Euro socialist influences that attempted to grow beyond basic tenets cognitive psyche interaction design. But what if my only experience was in cognitive psyche that was called into question by post-cog activity theorists?

    Okay, so that's probably off the deep end: I understand the general thought here is to get every-day practitioners to think about why people behave the way they do, in easy to eat, bite-size wrappers (and if you can mention neurons, synapses or cognitive overload, all the better, right?).

    So like a lot of things, I think UX designers should tread carefully. Don't tell a client to shove off when you think their design strategy doesn't jive with what you think you learned in Psyche 101 in 2003 (or if you just finished one book on activity theory ;-)), but let fundamental, generally accepted principles of psychology influence how your audience may engage with your product or service (but just be prepared to back it up).

    Reply

Leave a Reply

13 − 5 =