14 Responses

  1. Perception and the Design Community | Aaron Irizarry - User Experience Designer, Blogger, Speaker, Dad, Star Wars Fan, Lover of Coffee

    […] read a great article related to this earlier in the week by Elisabeth Hubert titled “Are You “Good Enough” at Being a UX Designer?” it is definitely worth a read, no matter what kind of design or development you […]

  2. Jordan Burke
    Jordan Burke at |

    Thanks for this post! Speaking as a relatively inexperienced front-end and UX designer, trying to enter the field (especially with most of your knowledge being scrounged from blogs and books read in one’s spare time) can be a little intimidating. It’s posts like this that remind me it never hurts to ask for a little help and direction about the process!

    Reply
  3. Anonymous
    Anonymous at |

    Just wanted to say that I really enjoyed this post. It strikes at that deep, dark place we all never want to talk about, but struggle with daily. You points about how to combat that are excellent. Thanks!

    Reply
    1. Lis Hubert
      Lis Hubert at |

      Thanks so much… and so glad you enjoyed it!

      Reply
  4. Russ
    Russ at |

    Hi Lis–nnI’m very humbled that you mentioned me in your blog post–and I think you’re pretty spot on with what we were trying to show: When you see how the four of us each did our work, there’s an awful lot of overlap. The wireframes from other people probably aren’t all that different from yours–maybe a style thing here or there, but really… they’re for communication.nnIt’s the same reason we opened up a lot of the work product from “A Project Guide to UX Design” on projectuxd.com – so people can take a look, expand and do what fits their needs.nnGreat post–and thanks again for the mention!

    Reply
    1. Lis Hubert
      Lis Hubert at |

      Thanks Russ! You are, of course, more than welcome. I’ll be sure to pass along the projectuxd.com information as well… it is an extremely helpful resource. Can’t wait for the next talk as I’m sure it’ll inspire some more ideas for me.

      Reply
  5. Anonymous
    Anonymous at |

    Great post, Lis. nnI see two sides of a coin: lack of self-confidence and current limitations. In the context of interviewing or pitching a client I’ve found that communicating low self-confidence negatively affects the experience. But, being honest about my limitations keeps the dialog open. I’ve had countless interviews where I couldn’t answer a Javascript or CSS question and ended up getting the job or job offer because I simply said, “I forgot the syntax for that. I should know it. But I get the concept and could find the right syntax in a few minutes if I had to.”nnIf I don’t believe in my ability to learn, I lack self-confidence. And I can be tempted to bluff my way through a situation, which inevitably fails in a knowledge-based context like Web work. If I know I can’t do something, but I believe in my ability to learn and adapt, I feel confident in disclosing that limitation. And by doing so, I earn trust and respect by providing an accurate assessment so that the interviewer or business rep can make a sound, money-or-time-based decision.

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    1. Lis Hubert
      Lis Hubert at |

      Wow, great insights Danny! This is an awesome extension to the ideas in the post!! I completely agree with what you are saying and tend to behave the same way…. great minds?

      Reply
  6. Anonymous
    Anonymous at |

    Great post, Lis. I see two sides of a coin: lack of self-confidence and current limitations. In the context of interviewing or pitching a client I’ve found that communicating low self-confidence negatively affects the experience. But, being honest about my limitations keeps the dialog open. I’ve had countless interviews where I couldn’t answer a Javascript or CSS question and ended up getting the job or job offer because I simply said, “I forgot the syntax for that. I should know it. But I get the concept and could find the right syntax in a few minutes if I had to.”nnIf I don’t believe in my ability to learn, I lack self-confidence. And I can be tempted to bluff my way through a situation, which inevitably fails in a knowledge-based context like Web work. If I know I can’t do something, but I believe in my ability to learn and adapt, I feel confident in disclosing that limitation. And by doing so, I earn trust and respect by providing an accurate assessment so that the interviewer or business rep can make a sound, money-or-time-based decision.

    Reply
  7. jefro
    jefro at |

    how do you define “good enough”? and how do you walk the delicate tightrope between contentment and ambition? and how can the universe be infinite yet expanding at the same time?

    Reply
  8. Ray
    Ray at |

    Ok Lis. I think I’m going to have to start to get credit for inspiring your posts about lack of confidence and not blogging. 😉 Seroiusly, thanks for sharing your perspective on a lot of the issues we face as UX practitioners in an open, honest and fearless way.

    Reply
    1. Lis Hubert
      Lis Hubert at |

      You totally should! hahaha! Thanks for the feedback friend… much appreciated as always.

      Reply
  9. Lori
    Lori at |

    Awesome post Lis! We all have people in this industry we admire. There is no excuse for not becoming more familiar with the knowledge they have. You have offered great ideas for doing so.

    Reply
    1. Lis Hubert
      Lis Hubert at |

      Thanks Lori! That was my goal… glad it was helpful 🙂

      Reply

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