5 Responses

  1. Jess
    Jess at |

    I agree that you need to back up UX decisions with X Y Z… We can’t just go into a room and think that people will automatically love the idea. UX people need to start backing up designs with real data so that we build our credibility! n

    Reply
  2. Nathanael Boehm
    Nathanael Boehm at |

    Totally agree about the evidence-based decisions and the numbers; only just blogged about this in the last couple of days and something I’m pondering:nnhttp://www.purecaffeine.com/2011/04/determining-less-than-satisfactory-user-experience/

    Reply
  3. Brian Hurst
    Brian Hurst at |

    Your article made me think of an issue I’m currently facing.nnI like getting feedback on design proposals, and certainly see the value of that – getting different perspectives, etc. It’s just that in a meeting, someone can give an opinion off the cuff, and because it is said out loud in a meeting that opinion seems to carry weight over a solution arrived at after perhaps hours of considering the related issues and different factors from a UX/design point of view.nnAny thoughts you have on soliciting feedback and implementing that feedback without it just automatically trumping design being carefullyarrived at would be great. nnThanks!

    Reply
    1. Lis Hubert
      Lis Hubert at |

      Ah yes that age old problem. For me it’s all about reminding the group about the rationale for the original decision and then asking how this new idea fits into or does not fit into the rational that we as a group agreed on earlier. So bringing up the problem we solved and why are solution was a good one then asking if this new idea accomplishes the same thing. I find you have to be really really pushy on this sometimes, but overall it’s best for the product/team.

      Reply
      1. Brian Hurst
        Brian Hurst at |

        Thanks very much for your insights – this is helpful!

        Reply

Leave a Reply

two × two =